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Asian Bamboo forest with morning sunlight.

SPECIALIST BAMBOO CONTROL SERVICES

 

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OUR SPECIALIST CONTROL SERVICES WILL TREAT OR ERADICATE THIS SPECIES. TO FIND OUT IF YOU HAVE BAMBOO USE OUR FREE ID TOOL OR BOOK A SURVEY

Bamboo

 

 

treatment & removal

We often get asked how hard is it to remove Bamboo?

Bamboo is very similar to Japanese knotweed in that its underground rhizomes can spread rapidly, and all fragments of the rhizomes need to be completely removed, making the fully grown plants problematic to eradicate as all parts of the plant above and below ground growth need to be completely removed from site. The stems can be cut down and treated with herbicide or completely dug out – but this must be done by a trained professional if the result is required to be permanent.

To find out the best way to remove Bamboo and the best time of year to have treatment or excavation carried out get in touch. Read more on how to get rid of Bamboo permanently.

WHY IS BAMBOO A PROBLEM?

Bamboo is not classed as an ‘invasive’ species under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, hence there are currently no restrictions on planting it. However, the invasive nature and rapid growth pattern of this plant is a problem to homeowners and commercial businesses alike. Public encroachment cases are becoming more common in the UK, with homeowners taking legal action against neighbours who allow bamboo to spread onto their property.

The running plant’s rhizomes can, if not controlled quickly spread beyond its original planted location and encroach into neighbouring land. Bamboo rhizome and growth has also been recorded as causing minor damage to buildings and infrastructures as it exploits any weak areas that it can grow through.

 

ABOUT BAMBOO

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Phyllostachys species
ORIGIN: Asia

Bamboo is a rapidly growing, tall non-flowering plant that produces clumps of thin elongated leaves from tall hollow stems. The two general patterns for the growth of bamboo are ‘clumping’ and ‘running’, with short and long underground rhizomes, respectively. Running Bamboo is the most invasive of the two as its name suggests the roots grow (or run) underground, with new shoots forming plants wherever it can.

  • Tall ridged, hollow canes.
  • Profuse green leaves.
  • Grows from underground rhizomes.
HABITAT

Bamboo can thrive in damp soil but not constantly waterlogged or excessively dry conditions. Often used as an ornamental garden plant or screen, however can spread rapidly and take over large areas.

IMPACT: MEDIUM

Although Bamboos have a very positive effect in their ability to absorb large volumes of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, they are becoming known for causing local land issues.

TOXICITY: ZERO

Bamboo presents no physical danger to either humans or animals.

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