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Three Cornered Leek, Snowbell, Allium triquetrum

SPECIALIST THREE-CORNERED GARLIC CONTROL SERVICES

 

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OUR SPECIALIST CONTROL SERVICES WILL TREAT OR ERADICATE THIS SPECIES. TO FIND OUT IF YOU HAVE THREE-CORNERED GARLIC USE OUR FREE ID TOOL OR BOOK A SURVEY

Three Cornered Leek, Snowbell, Allium triquetrum growing amongst trees

 

 

TREATMENTS & REMOVAL

Three-cornered garlic is best controlled via herbicide or by digging it up. Herbicide treatments will stop the spread, and should be carried out multiple times, however for complete eradication mechanical methods are required such as digging out the plant and roots. As the plant waste is deemed ‘hazardous’ it will need to be taken to a suitably licensed landfill.

To find out the best way to remove Three-cornered garlic and the best time of year to have treatment or excavation carried out get in touch.

WHY IS THREE-CORNERED GARLIC A PROBLEM?

This plant is listed as a Schedule 9 species under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, therefore it is an offence to plant or allow to spread into the wild as it will quickly take over habitats. It is not illegal to plant on your own property but it is an offence to allow it to spread onto other properties.

It thrives in woodlands which can make access for treatment or eradication difficult to navigate.

ABOUT THREE-CORNERED GARLIC

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Allium triquetrum
ORIGIN: Mediterranean Basin

Three-cornered garlic (or Three-cornered leek, as it’s sometimes called) is a bulbous perennial with a characteristic garlic odour. It can be mistaken for snowdrops, young bluebells, young daffodils or some lilies, but none of these look-alikes smell of garlic. It arrived in the UK in 1759 but was first spotted in the wild in 1849 after it escaped from horticulture.

  • Short to medium tufted plant.
  • Floppy, triangular leaves.
  • White flowers are bell shaped, 10 – 18mm long with a strong green stripe going down the middle of each pettle.
  • Flowers form in an umbrella format from each central stem.
HABITAT

A shade lover, it is most commonly found in woodlands, alongside roads, verges and banks in southern and western Britain but is on the increase and spreading further north.

IMPACT: MEDIUM

Three-cornered garlic threatens biodiversity as the plant aggressively forms monocultural masses, having the potential to rapidly occupy large tracts of land. It out-competes native plants, dominating the ground-flora when conditions are suitable (mostly shaded).

TOXICITY: ZERO

Three-cornered garlic presents no physical danger to either humans or animals, and can be used in recipes.

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